Saturday, March 21, 2020

My Foolproof Coronavirus ( Covid - 19 ) Aversion Plan | Coping with Troubled Times.




Camping offers the ultimate social distancing experience!

Go Camping! That’s right, it’s that simple. Well admittedly camping has always been at the heart of my survival plan.

What better way is there to meet the ‘best practices’ outlined be the CDC.  Camping tends to naturally limit social contact by segregating camping spots in campgrounds and many of us prefer primitive camping anyway. You don’t have to worry about what you touch because it’s all natural and uncontaminated. It’s also good to hang out in sun light as it kills micro type things fast.

This current absence of basketball, hockey, baseball games and everything else could make some of us just completely stir crazy. You are going to need something to help you keep your head on straight. Why not use this sporting events down time to enjoy the best family experience opportunity available - camping! 

We all could stand to get away from the news for a while anyway. I am guessing you won’t actually miss a thing. It will all be there when you get back. Twenty-four hour news is the worst invention ever, not just because it keeps rehashing everything that has already been said but it also creates massive speculation from god knows how many ‘experts’, as to what might happen in the future. After all they do have to fill up 24 hours  with something.

We do need to take this whole thing seriously, but we don’t need to obsess about it.

Therefore, camping can give you a welcome emotional sanctuary and a much, much needed repose from the daunting anxiety of rampant speculation news. Hey you might even want to plan out a camping vacation this year. This might be the best chance you’ll ever have to visit those usually overrun parks and monuments, well at least if they do remain open. Make sure you are camping though, so you can minimize exposure to virus infested motel rooms and restaurants.

How I Cope with Uncertain Times! 

Two things that keep the world in perspective for me in really troubling times such as this:

1 - It is somewhat consoling to look back on other horrendous events I have had to experience personally and remember somehow I made it through. WE made it through. You don’t get to my age without having lived through some traumatic and downright scary happenings. 

  • The assassination of John Kennedy - (This started a string of them.) Looking back the hardest part might have been watching highly respected teachers literally cry in class as we listen helplessly to the account on the radio.
  • The Vietnam War - The shootings at Kent State perhaps most exemplified how torn our nation was. Americans shooting Americans, it really was and still is unthinkable. Also, because I went, any time I even just have a bad day, I say to myself, “Ken, you haven’t heard a rocket crack off in a long time, it could be worse.”  
  • 911 - Anybody over 30 will remember the horror and all the accompanying uncertainty that came with it.
  • Many personal losses - Parents, all four of my brothers, all my aunts and uncles and some of the best friends I ever had. 


2 - It’s also good to consider what it must have been like for other human beings to have lived through other exceptionally troubling times in history and even regional catastrophes today like:

  • The Great Depression - These were some people that knew the real meaning of economic disaster.
  • World Wars and especially the Civil war - I can’t even imagine the horror, despair and anxiety of that one.
  • Plagues - this Covid -19 shutdown is only new to us. Similar things have happened before. Cambridge university closed for two years because of the black plague in 1665.  
  • Famine - sadly this is still with us today in many parts of the world.
  • Earthquakes, tornadoes, forest fires, floods and other natural disasters absolutely wreak havoc every year somewhere. 


Emotionally and economically devastating events have happened throughout history, happen today, obviously, and will continue to happen in the future. The real key to coping with the anxiety and insecurity of these events lies in your own self-sufficiency. I don’t mean just having enough toilet paper. I mean knowing you can sustain your own existence for an extended period of time without help. 

We have made it through bad times before. Strive for self-sufficiency as you are no good to anyone else without your own health and being.

Most importantly what your kids will need is what they have always needed, YOU. If you are there with them, they will be fine but don’t radiate your own anxieties. After all, kids already know what it’s like to not have control over situations. We could learn from them. 

So coping is really all about taking care of yourself and the people you love. Do that and you’ll be okay and Go Camping!  It will help.

Have a look at my new Youtube Trailer, it might help get you motivated:







Friday, February 7, 2020

So Begins Another Year ( or decade as it be.)

January is already gone and we are a week into February. Is it just me or is time actually going faster?

You'll find out when you get old the only thing that really happens fast is getting older. If you keep your health though, you can still do all those things you love but just not as fast. This ranges from everything from sporting ventures to mind activities to bodily functions. You can still do them although not as fast and don't expect to command the same skill level. Also, be prepared for the back, neck, shoulders etc. to voice their dismay a day or so later. 

The other thing about getting old is you spend a lot of time pondering your time wasting youth. In my case my mind wonders back to the very earliest of memories.  It's very odd how you can recall those rather  clearly but can't remember the time in the middle like anything about the fifth grade, even who your teacher was. Worse yet, where did I put the tape measure down five minutes ago?

This can be somewhat mitigated by forcing yourself to develop mindful habits. Years ago I use to lose my keys with great regularity. That never happens now because I have trained myself to put them in only one of three places.


  1. on the dresser.
  2. in my pocket.
  3. in the vehicle.
Truth be known I shouldn't say 'never', there is one exception to my lose the keys problem. I have a small Leatherman tool on my key chain. Occasionally, I'll use the screwdriver, knife or pliers of the tool then set them down where ever I am. ( I guess my mind thinks it's okay to deviate from my routine because it's thinking of the tool not the keys.) Fortunately, I can usually 'back track' to where they are.

When I fixed electronics stuff for a living, I would, with some regularity, set my screw drive down on a shelf or appliance but not on my work bench or in the toolbox where it should be. Then, of course, I would promptly forget where.  The only thing that ever worked for finding it was to accuse my fellow workers of stealing it. I would proclaim with great absolution, "I WHAT THAT SCREWDRIVER YOU STOLE!" Amazingly, after so making a complete fool of myself, I would often look right at it.

Thus, if you can't find something all you have to do is resolutely accuse someone of stealing it.

My theory for why this works deals with that inner child we have in our minds.  That child has the ability to block the flow of information to the conscious part of the mind. Furthermore, my inner child is a total brat and just loves to see me make a complete fool of myself. 

Your big question is what does this all have to do with camping! Ha! Everything. Getting it right is all about good habits in life and especially when camping. Here is my playlist of One Minute Camping-tips.com videos to help you develop your camping routines: 




The only way I have found to make both my 'Inner Child' and 'Outer Old Dude' happy at the same time is to do something they both like.

Go Camping! - Ken